Betula pubescens

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Betula pubescens Ehrh.

Betulaceae

Life form: shrub
Usage: economic plant

Exposure: sun - Exposure: half shade   1

Moisture: moist bis Moisture: wet

Soil: gritty loam

Arrangement: alternate
Leaves: decidious

Shape: rhomboid

Division: simple

    

Shape: not specified
Fruit: samara

III

3A / f8da21 

Inflorescence: not specified

Petals: not specified
Habit: not specified

Canopy: narrowly conical

Taxonomy

Divisio:
Magnoliophyta
Subdivisio:
Magnoliophytina
Classis:
Rosopsida
Subclassis:
Hamamelididae
Superordo:
Faganae
Ordo:
Corylales

Betula pubescens, commonly known as white birch, downy birch, is a shrub.

Naming

Betula pubescens was described by Jakob Friedrich Ehrhart in 1791. The name is considered as validly published.

Taxonomy

Betula pubescens is a species in the genus Betula which contains approximately 133 to 211 species and belongs to the family of the Betulaceae (Birch Family).

Characteristics

Betula pubescens - habitus
Betula pubescens - branches
Betula pubescens - stems

Growth

The shrubs reach heights of 18 to 20 metres. The plants reach a width of 8 to 15 metres.

Wood and Bark

The bark is silver-grey.

Leaves

Betula pubescens is deciduous. The dark-green, simple leaves are alternate. They are rhomboid with dentate margins. They turn an attractive yellow in autumn.

Flowers and Fruits

Betula pubescens produces yellow flowers in March. The plants are dioecious, pollination takes places by allogamy through the wind.

The shrubs produce samaras.

Root System

Distribution

Betula pubescens is native to the whole of Europe, the Caucasus, West-Siberia and East Siberia.

Cultivation

The shrubs prefer a sunny to half-shady situation on moist to wet soil. The substrate should be gritty loam with a pH between 6,5 and 7,5. They tolerate temperatures below -45°C (USDA zone 1). The plants are suited for the shores areas of and in natural standing bodies of water.

Uses

Suited for noise and dust protection, as well as suited as avenue tree, slope plant and as bee pasture.

Maintenance and Propagation

Cultivars

Pests and Diseases

Literature

  • Walter Erhardt, Erich Götz, Nils Bödeker, Siegmund Seybold: Der große Zander. Eugen Ulmer KG, Stuttgart 2008, ISBN 978-3-8001-5406-7. (Ger.)
  • Christoper Brickell (Editor-in-chief): RHS A-Z Encyclopedia of Garden Plants. Third edition. Dorling Kindersley, London 2003, ISBN 0-7513-3738-2.

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