Allium saxatile

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Allium saxatile M.Bieb.

Alliaceae

Life form: bulb or tuber

Exposure: sun  

Moisture: dry bis Moisture: moderately moist

Soil: sandy loam - Soil: gritty loam - Soil: sandy clay - Soil: loamy clay - Soil: peat

Arrangement: basal
Leaves: decidious

Shape: linear

Division: simple

Shape: not specified
Fruit: loculicidal capsule

63D / e981ab 

Inflorescence: umbel

Petals: not specified
Habit: not specified

Growth form: not specified

Taxonomy

Divisio:
Magnoliophyta
Subdivisio:
Magnoliophytina
Classis:
Liliopsida
Subclassis:
Liliidae
Superordo:
Lilianae
Ordo:
Amaryllidales

Allium saxatile belongs to the group of bulbous and tuberous plants.

Naming

Allium saxatile was described by Friedrich August Marschall von Bieberstein in 1798. The name is considered as validly published.

Taxonomy

Allium saxatile is a species in the genus Allium which contains approximately 943 to 1011 species and belongs to the family of the Alliaceae (Garlic Family). The type species of the genus is Allium sativum.

Characteristics

Growth

Leaves

Allium saxatile is deciduous. The simple leaves are basal. They are linear with entire margins and parallel venation.

Flowers and Fruits

Allium saxatile produces umbels of pink flowers.

The plants produce loculicidal capsules.

Root System

Distribution

Allium saxatile is native to the European Russia (Belarus, the Ukraine, Moldova, Crimea) and Central Asia.

Cultivation

The plants prefer a sunny situation on dry to moderately moist soil. The substrate should be sandy-loamy, gritty-loamy, sandy clay, loamy clay or peaty soil.

Uses

Maintenance and Propagation

Cultivars

Pests and Diseases

Literature

  • Walter Erhardt, Erich Götz, Nils Bödeker, Siegmund Seybold: Der große Zander. Eugen Ulmer KG, Stuttgart 2008, ISBN 978-3-8001-5406-7. (Ger.)
  • Christoper Brickell (Editor-in-chief): RHS A-Z Encyclopedia of Garden Plants. Third edition. Dorling Kindersley, London 2003, ISBN 0-7513-3738-2.

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