Quercus dentata

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Quercus dentata Thunb.

Fagaceae

Life form: tree
Usage: economic plant

Exposure: sun - Exposure: half shade   5

Moisture: moderately moist bis Moisture: moist

Soil: sandy loam - Soil: gritty loam - Soil: sandy clay

Arrangement: alternate
Leaves: decidious

Shape: obovate

Division: simple

Shape: not specified
Fruit: nut

 

Inflorescence: spike

Petals: not specified
Habit: not specified

Canopy: rounded to broadly spreading

Taxonomy

Divisio:
Magnoliophyta
Subdivisio:
Magnoliophytina
Classis:
Rosopsida
Subclassis:
Hamamelididae
Superordo:
Faganae
Ordo:
Fagales

Quercus dentata, commonly known as daimio oak, Japanese Emperor oak, is a tree with ovate to orbicular fruits.

Naming

Quercus dentata was described by Carl Peter Thunberg in 1784. The name is considered as validly published.

Taxonomy

Quercus dentata is a species in the genus Quercus which contains approximately 641 to 798 species and belongs to the family of the Fagaceae (Beech Family). The type species of the genus is Quercus robur.

Characteristics

Quercus dentata - leaves
Quercus dentata - branches

Growth

The trees have a rounded to broadly spreading canopy and reach heights of 10 to 25 metres.

Wood and Bark

Leaves

Quercus dentata is deciduous. The green, simple leaves are alternate. They are obovate, sinuate and petiolate.

Flowers and Fruits

Quercus dentata produces flowers that are arranged in spikes from April to May.

The trees carry brown nuts.

Root System

Distribution

Quercus dentata is native to Japan, Korea, North China and West China.

Cultivation

The trees prefer a sunny to half-shady situation on fresh to moist soil. The substrate should be comparatively rich with a pH between 4 and 6. The plants prefer sandy-loamy, gritty-loamy or sandy clay soil. They tolerate temperatures down to -29°C (USDA zone 5).

Uses

Suited as avenue tree and as specimen plant.

Maintenance and Propagation

  • Remove crossing shoots late in winter or in early spring to promote healthy growth.

Propagate by sowing seed in a cold frame when seeds are ripe or by grafting.

Cultivars

Pests and Diseases

Honeydew, galls and distorted leaves are a sign for an infestation with aphids. Use an insecticide or control biologically , e.g. with parasitic wasps or predators such as Aphidoletes aphidimyza.

A powdery white coat on the plants indicates an infection with powdery mildew. Remove affected plants and apply a fungicide. To prevent infection improve ventilation, keep the roots moist and do not water the plants from above.

Stunted growth, fungal fruiting bodies in autumn and dieback of the plants indicate an infection with honey fungus. Remove affected plants including roots.

Literature

  • Walter Erhardt, Erich Götz, Nils Bödeker, Siegmund Seybold: Der große Zander. Eugen Ulmer KG, Stuttgart 2008, ISBN 978-3-8001-5406-7. (Ger.)
  • Christoper Brickell (Editor-in-chief): RHS A-Z Encyclopedia of Garden Plants. Third edition. Dorling Kindersley, London 2003, ISBN 0-7513-3738-2.

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