Pelargonium peltatum

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Pelargonium peltatum (L.) L'Hér. ex Aiton

Geraniaceae

Life form: climber
Usage: ornamental plant

Exposure: sun   9

Moisture: moderately moist bis Moisture: moist

Soil: sandy loam

Arrangement: alternate
Leaves: evergreen

Shape: palmately lobed

Division: simple

Shape: five-stellate
Fruit: schizocarp

63D / e981ab 

Inflorescence: umbel

Petals: not specified
Habit: not specified

Growth form: clump-forming

Taxonomy

Divisio:
Magnoliophyta
Subdivisio:
Magnoliophytina
Classis:
Rosopsida
Subclassis:
Rosidae
Superordo:
Geranianae
Ordo:
Geraniales
[Modify]   [Versions]

Pelargonium peltatum, commonly known as ivy-leaved geranium, is a succulent climber.

Contents

Naming

Pelargonium peltatum was already described and the name validly published by Carl Linnaeus. It was Charles Louis L'Héritier de Brutelle, however, who reclassified it into todays valid botanical systematics in 1789.

Taxonomy

Pelargonium peltatum is a species in the genus Pelargonium which contains approximately 62 to 1479 species and belongs to the family of the Geraniaceae (Geranium Family). The type species of the genus is Pelargonium hirsutum.

Characteristics

Pelargonium peltatum - flowers

Growth

The climbers reach heights of 50 to 200 centimetres. The plants reach a width of 30 to 60 centimetres.

Leaves

Pelargonium peltatum is evergreen. The mid-green, simple leaves are alternate. They are palmately lobed, entire and petiolate. The surface of the leaves is glabrous.

Flowers and Fruits

Pelargonium peltatum produces umbels of pink five-stellate flowers from April to October.

The climbers produce schizocarps.

Root System

Distribution

Pelargonium peltatum is native to South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland.

Cultivation

The climbers prefer a sunny situation on fresh to moist soil. The substrate should be sandy loam. They tolerate temperatures down to -7°C (USDA zone 9). Under glass use loamy potting compost.

In summer the plants prefer protection from hot midday sun. In winter the plants prefer not too bright light.

Classification after Prof. Dr. Sieber

  • flower beds (rich soil)

Tolerance of special soil conditions

  • none: drought

Uses

Suited for hanging baskets and for balconies and terraces, as well as suited as cemetery plant and as container plant.

Maintenance and Propagation

  • Remove withered flowers.
  • Repot as necessary at the beginning of the growing season.
  • For healthy growth apply a compound fertilizer every 2 to 3 weeks during growth.
  • Water moderately in summer, give little water in winter.
  • Lightly cut back at the beginning of the growing period.

Propagate by cuttings in summer.

Cultivars

Pests and Diseases

Distorted, discoloured or dead leaves and flowers are a sign of a bacterial infection. Generously cut out affected parts. Improve hygiene and control insects that may spread the infection.

Sudden wilting and pale green discolouration indicate a fungal infection (phytophthora). Remove infected plants. Avoid by improving drainage and over-fertilization.

Literature

  • Walter Erhardt, Erich Götz, Nils Bödeker, Siegmund Seybold: Der große Zander. Eugen Ulmer KG, Stuttgart 2008, ISBN 978-3-8001-5406-7. (Ger.)
  • Christoper Brickell (Editor-in-chief): RHS A-Z Encyclopedia of Garden Plants. Third edition. Dorling Kindersley, London 2003, ISBN 0-7513-3738-2.

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