Kniphofia galpinii

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Kniphofia galpinii Baker

Xanthorrhoeaceae

Life form: perennial
Usage: ornamental plant

Exposure: sun   8

Moisture: moist

Soil: sandy loam

Arrangement: basal
Leaves: evergreen

Shape: linear

Division: simple

Shape: tubular
Fruit: loculicidal capsule

28B / ff7117 

Inflorescence: raceme

Petals: not specified
Habit: not specified

Growth form: not specified

Taxonomy

Divisio:
Magnoliophyta
Subdivisio:
Magnoliophytina
Classis:
Liliopsida
Subclassis:
Liliidae
Superordo:
Lilianae
Ordo:
Xantorrhoeales

Kniphofia galpinii is a perennial.

Naming

Kniphofia galpinii was described by John Gilbert Baker in 1896. The name is considered as validly published.

Taxonomy

Kniphofia galpinii is a species in the genus Kniphofia which contains approximately 74 to 85 species and belongs to the family of the Asphodelaceae (Asphodelus Family).

Characteristics

Growth

The perennials reach heights of 60 to 80 centimetres.

Leaves

Kniphofia galpinii is evergreen. The simple leaves are basal. They are linear with entire margins. The leaves are around 30 to 40 centimetres large and have a glabrous surface.

Flowers and Fruits

Kniphofia galpinii produces racemes of orange tubular flowers from September to October.

The perennials produce loculicidal capsules.

Root System

Distribution

Kniphofia galpinii is native to South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland.

Cultivation

The perennials prefer a sunny situation on moist soil. The substrate should be sandy-loamy and comparatively rich. They tolerate temperatures down to -12°C (USDA zone 8).

Classification after Prof. Dr. Sieber

  • flower beds (rich soil)
  • open areas

Tolerance of special soil conditions

  • high: road salt

Uses

The perennials are best planted in groups of 3 to 10. Suited for rockeries and for perennial borders, as well as suited as specimen plant.

Maintenance and Propagation

  • The brighter the light the better the development of the flowers.
  • Remove flower heads in autumn.
  • Plant in spring.
  • For healthy growth apply potassium-accentuated fertilizer at planting and give horn splinters in autumn.

Propagate by sowing seed in a cold frame in spring or by division in late spring.

Cultivars

Poisonousness

Kniphofia galpinii is toxic.

Aeskulap  Please read the health issues note

Pests and Diseases

White spots on flowers and leaves in combination with buds that do not open indicate an infestation with thrips. These insects can be controlled by improving ventilation and by watering regularly as well as by using an insecticide or biolocial pest control (predatory mites).

Gnaw marks and slime trails indicate a problem with slugs. Prevent infestation by improving hygiene and by regularly working the soil. In case of an infestation use slug pellets or nematodes to control pest. Handpicking the slug also helps, do this preferably in the evening hours.

Literature

  • Walter Erhardt, Erich Götz, Nils Bödeker, Siegmund Seybold: Der große Zander. Eugen Ulmer KG, Stuttgart 2008, ISBN 978-3-8001-5406-7. (Ger.)
  • Christoper Brickell (Editor-in-chief): RHS A-Z Encyclopedia of Garden Plants. Third edition. Dorling Kindersley, London 2003, ISBN 0-7513-3738-2.

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