Difference between revisions of "Populus x canescens"

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titel=Populus_x_canescens
 
titel=Populus_x_canescens
 
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'''Populus x canescens''', commonly known as ''Grey Poplar'', is a tree.
+
'''Populus x canescens''', commonly known as ''Grey Poplar'', is a tree.  
 
== Naming ==
 
== Naming ==
 
Populus x canescens was already described and the name validly published by William Aiton. It was not until 1804, however, that James Edward Smith reclassified it into todays valid botanical systematics.
 
Populus x canescens was already described and the name validly published by William Aiton. It was not until 1804, however, that James Edward Smith reclassified it into todays valid botanical systematics.
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The Grey Poplar is a species in the [[genus]] [[Populus]] (''poplar'') which contains 35 species and belongs to the [[Familia|family]] of the [[Salicaceae]] (''Willow Family'').
 
The Grey Poplar is a species in the [[genus]] [[Populus]] (''poplar'') which contains 35 species and belongs to the [[Familia|family]] of the [[Salicaceae]] (''Willow Family'').
 
== Characteristics ==
 
== Characteristics ==
 +
''Massive, clean, high branches; to 40m;'' dense dark grey-green foliage, jagged/ weeping; top branches sweep over like a [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catherine_wheel Catherine-Wheel].
 
=== Growth ===
 
=== Growth ===
The trees grow to a height of approximately 20 meters and have a rounded to broadly columnar shape.  
+
The trees grow to a height of approximately 40 meters and have a rounded to broadly columnar shape.  
 
=== Wood and Bark ===
 
=== Wood and Bark ===
 
=== Leaves ===
 
=== Leaves ===
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The fruits are loculicidal [[capsule]]s. They develop in spring.
 
The fruits are loculicidal [[capsule]]s. They develop in spring.
 
=== Root System ===
 
=== Root System ===
 +
 
== Distribution ==
 
== Distribution ==
 
Populus x canescens is native to the whole of Europe, with the exception of Northern Europe and the Iberian Peninsula where it is naturalized, to Turkey and the Caucasus and is naturalized in the US.
 
Populus x canescens is native to the whole of Europe, with the exception of Northern Europe and the Iberian Peninsula where it is naturalized, to Turkey and the Caucasus and is naturalized in the US.
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== Uses==
 
== Uses==
 +
Commonly used as Shelter belt or Avenue trees
  
 
== Maintenance ==
 
== Maintenance ==
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{{health warning}}
 
{{health warning}}
 
== Pests and Diseases ==
 
== Pests and Diseases ==
 +
Poplar trees are vulnerable to a variety of different insects and diseases such as borers, bark beetles, stem cankers, fungal leaf spots and vascular diseases. The stem cankers are the most difficult to get rid of and can only really be eliminated by pruning the affected stems. While many of these problems can be remedied through insecticide and fungicide, in many cases these trees are better off cut down to prevent the spread of the diseases and insects to other trees. Also, while these poplars can become infected by diseases and insects, they are more likely to survive them than other trees.
 +
 
== Man and Populus x canescens==
 
== Man and Populus x canescens==
 
=== History ===
 
=== History ===
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=== Superstition ===
 
=== Superstition ===
 
== See also ==
 
== See also ==
 +
[http://www.gardenguides.com/99654-poplar-tree.html#ixzz1q34fqD7b Read more: What Is a Poplar Tree? ]
 +
 
== References ==
 
== References ==
 
=== Literature ===
 
=== Literature ===

Revision as of 17:30, 24 March 2012

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Populus x canescens (Aiton) Sm.

Salicaceae

Life form: tree
Usage: economic plant / Usage: ornamental plant

Exposure: sun   5

Moisture: moderately moist bis Moisture: wet

Soil: loam - Soil: sandy loam - Soil: gritty loam - Soil: clay - Soil: sandy clay - Soil: loamy clay

Arrangement: alternate
Leaves: decidious

Shape: ovate

Division: simple

Shape: cup-shaped
Fruit: loculicidal capsule

IV

150B / c3d238 

Inflorescence: spike

Petals: not specified
Habit: pendant

Canopy: rounded to broadly columnar

Taxonomy

Divisio:
Magnoliophyta
Subdivisio:
Magnoliophytina
Classis:
Rosopsida
Subclassis:
Dilleniidae
Superordo:
Violanae
Ordo:
Salicales

Populus x canescens, commonly known as Grey Poplar, is a tree.

Naming

Populus x canescens was already described and the name validly published by William Aiton. It was not until 1804, however, that James Edward Smith reclassified it into todays valid botanical systematics.

Taxonomy

The Grey Poplar is a species in the genus Populus (poplar) which contains 35 species and belongs to the family of the Salicaceae (Willow Family).

Characteristics

Massive, clean, high branches; to 40m; dense dark grey-green foliage, jagged/ weeping; top branches sweep over like a Catherine-Wheel.

Growth

The trees grow to a height of approximately 40 meters and have a rounded to broadly columnar shape.

Wood and Bark

Leaves

Populus x canescens is a decidious plant with simple leaves. The leaves are arranged opposite one another. They are dark green and ovate with toothed margins.


Flowers and Fruit

The flowers are cup-shaped and pale green. The plants bloom in April. The flowers are arranged in spikes.

The fruits are loculicidal capsules. They develop in spring.

Root System

Distribution

Populus x canescens is native to the whole of Europe, with the exception of Northern Europe and the Iberian Peninsula where it is naturalized, to Turkey and the Caucasus and is naturalized in the US.

Cultivation

The Grey Poplar prefers a sunny site and can withstand temperatures down to -28,2º C. It grows best in loamy soil, sandy or pebbly, loamy soil, clay soil, sandy or loamy clay soil that is moderately moist to wet.


Uses

Commonly used as Shelter belt or Avenue trees

Maintenance

Varities and Cultivars

Poisonousness

Aeskulap  Please read the health issues note

Pests and Diseases

Poplar trees are vulnerable to a variety of different insects and diseases such as borers, bark beetles, stem cankers, fungal leaf spots and vascular diseases. The stem cankers are the most difficult to get rid of and can only really be eliminated by pruning the affected stems. While many of these problems can be remedied through insecticide and fungicide, in many cases these trees are better off cut down to prevent the spread of the diseases and insects to other trees. Also, while these poplars can become infected by diseases and insects, they are more likely to survive them than other trees.

Man and Populus x canescens

History

Populus x canescens in art

Symbolism

Superstition

See also

Read more: What Is a Poplar Tree?

References

Literature

  • Walter Erhardt, Erich Götz, Nils Bödeker, Siegmund Seybold: Der große Zander. Eugen Ulmer KG, Stuttgart 2008, ISBN 978-3-8001-5406-7. (Ger.)
  • Christoper Brickell (Editor-in-chief): RHS A-Z Encyclopedia of Garden Plants. Third edition. Dorling Kindersley, London 2003, ISBN 0-7513-3738-2.
  • efloras.org

Footnotes

Non-commercial Links

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